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Working in the Round Contd

This, of course, is just a guide; differences in thread, tension, and the actual stitch used can affect the end results.  I offer these instructions as a guide, so you have some idea of how to increase the number of stitches per round, without going overboard and creating ripples in your piece.

Yes, I know this sounds confusing, “Why can’t you just use the same number of stitches on each round?”

The reason for this is that the beginning rounds increase in size by a larger factor, than the outer rings.  For instance, Round 1 is twice as big as the Inner Chain Ring.  Round 2 is only half again larger.  This makes Round 2 only 2 1/2 times larger than the inner ring, instead of being 4 times larger.  The later rounds do get larger, but they grow at a smaller rate, so you don’t have to add as many stitches for each round as you did to begin with.

Some people prefer to use an octagon (eight sided object) for a circle, because it is easier to get the octagon to lie flat.  

A simple pattern would be:
Ch 6 and connect to form a ring.

1st round: Ch 3 (Serves as 1st Dc.) Dc into ring. Ch 1. (2dc, ch 1) 6 times.  Sl st in beg ch to connect.

2nd round: Ch 3 (Serves as 1st Dc.)  Dc into each st across side. *(Dc, Ch 1, Dc) into Ch 1 sp.  Dc into each st across side.  Repeat from * around piece, connect to beg ch.
Repeat Round 2 to complete the piece.

This does have defined ‘breaks’ in the piece, but can be much easier to achieve a flat piece.  I choose to use the fully round pieces, since my tension makes the ‘corners’ very sharp; thus destroying the ‘round’ effect of an octagon for me.

Lace crochet doilies and tablecloths do follow the same basic principles, but due to the airy nature of the lace stitches, it is much easier to correct problems without having to rip out and rework.  

When I’m designing doilies, I don’t have to rip out rows, if I catch the problem in the earliest stages.  I simply start the process to counteract the problem immediately, and continue to work.
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Some people prefer to use an octagon (eight sided object) for a circle, because it is easier to get the octagon to lie flat.
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Pg1        Pg2