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Working in the Round

Crocheting in the Round has the full range of projects from super easy coasters and hot pads, to more advanced projects like The Dresden Plate Granny Square and Tunisian Crochet in the round.  By understanding a few rules about Round Crochet, you too, can design your own coasters, hot pads, Granny Squares or even lace doilies and table cloths.
  
One major plus to crocheting in the round is that you don’t turn the piece over, so you have a defined front and back to each piece.  Once you understand the minuses to crocheting in the round, you can design your own pieces with a little patience and close attention.

There are two real truths about Crocheting Round pieces:

If you look at the rings in an old tree, you notice that the outer rings are much larger than the center rings.  This holds true for crochet, as well: the outer rounds of your piece must have more stitches than the inner rings.
  
The key is a subtle balance of increasing stitches to each round without adding too many, if you want your piece to lie flat.
 
To correct curling in round pieces, you must increase the number of stitches in each round.  This is easier to repair without ripping out the affected areas.  If your piece is beginning to curl, start adding extra stitches around that row, and even more in the next row.
  
If a round piece of crochet is starting to ripple (also called buckling), then there are too many ‘increasing’ stitches.  You should ‘rip out’ a few rows, and reduce the number of increase stitches that you had used previously.  
  
 If the buckling or rippling isn’t too obvious, you can try to reduce the buckling by continuing to crochet around the piece but not add so many stitches, then continue to add fewer increase stitches in the next round.  However, this may not completely eliminate the buckling.  Most experienced crocheters prefer to rip out the affected area and start over.
 
 With all that said, you can use these *problems* with round crochet as a plus, if you are creating three dimensional pieces, such as bowls, or a ‘gathered’ effect in a trim.

This is my basic pattern for creating a Flat Round Piece:

Ch your desired number of chs, connect to form a ring.
1st round: I use this basic equation to find the number of stitches for the first round:
{Number of Chs} multiplied by 2, {add 2 to 4 more stitches}, as needed.

For Example:
{4 Chs to create inner ring}  Multiplied by 2 is 8 sts.  {Now add 2 to 4 more stitches}-depending on your tension, stitch size, and thread size- to finish the first round, so that it lies flat, but doesn*t buckle.
Normally, I use 10 sts in the first round, for a 4 Ch inner ring. DO NOT TURN.
2nd round: Work appropriate number of Chs to accommodate the height of your stitch (1 ch for Sc, 3 for Dc, etc.)  Work 2 sts in each st of round. Do Not Turn.
3rd round: Work appropriate number of Chs to accommodate the height of your stitch (1 ch for Sc, 3 for Dc, etc.)  Work 1 st in same st as Ch.  Work (1 St, 2 Sts, 1 st) all the way around.  Connect to beg ch with sl st.  Do Not Turn.
4th round: Work appropriate number of Chs to accommodate the height of your stitch (1 ch for Sc, 3 for Dc, etc.) 1 St in first st,  *Work (1 st, 1 st, 2 sts in same st).  Repeat from * around piece.  Connect to beg ch. Do Not Turn.
5th round: Work appropriate number of Chs to accommodate the height of your stitch (1 ch for Sc, 3 for Dc, etc.) 1st in first st, 1st in next 3 sts.  *Work (2 sts in one st, 1 St, 1 St, 1 st).  Repeat from * around piece. Connect to beg ch. Do Not Turn.
I continue in this pattern, by increasing the number single stitches between the 2 stitches for each round.
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*They can curl up like a cup, if you don’t take steps to prevent this.
*They can ripple and buckle like the edge of your grandma’s favorite fruit bowl,
if you go overboard while preventing
the curl.
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